Prescriptions

Repeat Prescriptions

Request a repeat prescription.

Please allow 72 working hours for prescriptions to be processed and remember to take weekends and bank holidays into account. Do not leave this to the last minute especially when going on holiday.

If you need medication regularly you should receive a repeat prescription form attached to your prescription. Please bring or send the form to us indicating what you need.

Postal requests need a SAE for posting back.

Please note prescription requests can be taken over the telephone or by completing the request form on our website.

Medication Reviews

Patients on repeat medication will be asked to see a doctor, nurse practitioner or practice nurse at least once a year to review these regular medications or may be asked to attend the practice for a blood test. Failure to do so my mean that medications have to be removed from your prescription.

Please ensure that you book an appropriate appointment to avoid unnecessary delays to further prescriptions.

Travelling abroad and Prescriptions

If travelling abroad for more than 3 months you need to obtain your medication in the country of your destination. Additionally, if you need medical advice, then please register with a local doctor in your country of destination as we cannot give advice to overseas patients. For more information please visit: Prescriptions Abroad

Early Renewal Prescription Requests

If you need to request a renewal prescription early before its expiry date then please can you explain the reasons as to why this is required. This is to reduce rejection rates.

For example a 2 monthly prescription will have a cut off rejection time of 3 weeks. i.e. if you ask for a renewal before 3 weeks of the date when the prescription is due then your request is automatically rejected.

You are free to have your medication dispensed by a pharmacy of your choice. Please click on the link below to view a NHS poster detailing what to do if undue pressure is being placed upon you to use a certain pharmacy which is not of you choosing. Combatting prescription direction (PDF).

Repeat prescriptions is medication that you take regularly that is approved by the doctors it does not include acute medication. If you have not had a repeat medication in the last 6 months it will no longer be on your “Repeat Medication” list (NHS rules not ours).

Electronic Prescription Service (E PS)

EPS is an electronic prescription service where by the patient nomination their chosen pharmacy so their prescription can be sent directly to the pharmacy without the need to obtain a paper copy from the GP practice.

The system can work very well and is liked by several patients however some points to bear in mind are:

  • Once a Prescription is issued by our surgery is does not appear instantly at the pharmacy. The process can take up to 48hrs or longer if there are NHS IT problems.
  • Once a prescription is approved by a GP it is given a unique “token” code sent to the “NHS spine”. The prescription is then “pulled down” by the pharmacist. Once a prescription is “pulled down” or part issued by the pharmacist it cannot be changed.
  • Once you nominate a pharmacy your prescriptions will be sent to that pharmacy even if you forget which pharmacy you have nominated. If you wish to change your nominated pharmacy then you need to write to us to let us know.
  • EPS is not 100% reliable and prescriptions do get lost or are delayed within the electronic transfer process due to NHS IT issues that are not within our control.
  • Controlled drugs are not issued on EPS.
  • Repeat medications are not ever lasting. If you have not seen a clinician or you have not attended the practice for appropriate clinical tests then repeat medications will be removed from your prescriptions under NHS requirements.

Prescriptions Charges and Exemptions

Extensive exemption and remission arrangements protect those likely to have difficulty in paying charges (NHS prescription and dental charges, optical and hospital travel costs).

The NHS prescription charge is a flat-rate amount which successive Governments have thought it reasonable to charge for those who can afford to pay for their medicines. Prescription prepayment certificates (PPCs) offer real savings for people who need extensive medication.

NHS Charges

If you will have to pay for four or more prescription items in three months, or more than 14 items in 12 months, you may find it cheaper to buy a PPC.

For more information about prescription charges please visit the NHS website: www.nhs.uk/prescriptioncosts

Replacing a Private Script with an NHS Prescription

We will only replace a private script with an NHS script providing an appropriate letter from the private consultant is supplied with the prescription. The letter will need to clearly detail the indication for starting the medication advised by the private consultant. Failure to provide this will result in a delay in issuing you an NHS prescription.

The decision to replace a private prescription with an NHS prescription remains with the patient’s GP under our local prescribing policies. Therefore if the indication to start a private medication falls outside of our local prescribing policies then the prescription will either be changed in accordance to good local evidence based prescribing or not be issued (it will remain a private prescription).

Your GP is not obliged to replace Private prescriptions with an NHS prescriptions if he/ she deems that it is not appropriate. Your private script can be used at any pharmacy but will encounter an appropriate drug charge.

Please allow up to 72hrs from the time of request to pick for all such prescriptions.

Private Prescription:

  • For drugs which are being issued solely in anticipation of the onset of an ailment whilst outside the UK, but for which the patient does not require treatment when the medicine is prescribed.
  • For drugs issued for the prevention of malaria.

Paracetamol Prescribing

Paracetamol on the NHS is 4 times more expensive than buying it in a supermarket. NHS guidance is that paracetamol should not be prescribed for short term or intermittent use but can be brought over the counter. For more information please visit: www.england.nhs.uk/prescription-curbs-to-free-up-hundreds-of-millions-of-pounds-for-frontline-care.